What is the ground floor Theatre section called?



The Apron is a section of the stage floor which projects towards or into the auditorium. In proscenium theatres, it’s the part of the stage in front of the house tabs, or in front of the proscenium arch, above the orchestra pit. Also known as Forestage.

What is the ground floor of a theatre called?

The first level of seating directly in front of the stage, generally starting below stage level and slowly rising as it reaches the back of the auditorium, is known as the stalls.

What are the sections of a theater called?

Lesson Content

  • Center Stage. The area that’s exactly in the middle of the acting area on the stage.
  • Downstage. The area of the stage that’s closer to the audience. …
  • Upstage. The area of the stage that’s farthest away from the audience. …
  • Stage Left/Stage Right. The areas of the stage that are to the actor’s left and right.





What are the 4 types of theatre spaces?

Theatre performance spaces fall into four categories: proscenium theatres, thrust theatres, arena theatres, and found spaces. This section will introduce you to the common parts of each theatre and the relative benefits of each type.

What are the 6 types of theatre spaces?

The most common types of stage arrangements are listed below.

  • Proscenium stages. Proscenium stages have an architectural frame, known as the proscenium arch, although not always arched in shape. …
  • Thrust stages. …
  • Theatres in-the-round. …
  • Arena theatres. …
  • Black-box or studio theatres. …
  • Platform stages. …
  • Hippodromes. …
  • Open air theatres.

What are the 3 main sections of seating in the theater?

Understanding the Theatre’s Layout



Take a look at the Seating chart below. The three primary seating sections in a Broadway Theatre are: The Orchestra (green section), The Mezzanine (in blue), and The Balcony (purple). Let’s break down each section…



What are the 9 areas of the stage?



Also known as Proscenium Staging. The end-on stage can be split into 9 areas: upstage right, upstage centre, upstage left, centre stage right, centre stage, centre stage left, downstage right, downstage centre, downstage left.

What are levels in theatre?

Levels can be used to suggest status – meaning the power or authority one character has over another. It’s important to consider what the use of levels suggests when staging a scene. Levels can also be used to suggest various locations.

Which of the places below are part of the auditorium?

Auditorium structure



The seating areas can include some or all of the following: Stalls, orchestra or arena: the lower flat area, usually below or at the same level as the stage. Balconies or galleries: one or more raised seating platforms towards the rear of the auditorium.

What are the 5 categories of theatre?

Terms in this set (5)

  • Commercial. Often puts emphasis on broad entertainment value and profitability. ( …
  • Historical. About drama that uses styles, themes, and staging of plays from a particular time period. ( …
  • Political. Focuses on how power is between groups of people. ( …
  • Experimental. An attempt to reinvent theatre. …
  • Cultural.


What are the 3 types of theatre stages?

Types of Performance Stages

  • Proscenium Stage. When thinking of a “theatre stage”, this is what typically comes to mind. …
  • Thrust Stage. A thrust stage, which has the audience is on 3 sides will thrust into the auditorium seating space. …
  • Black Box or Flexible Theatre.


What are the 4 types of staging?

The four main types of stages are:



  • Found stages.
  • Proscenium stages.
  • Thrust stages.
  • Arena stages.


What is mezzanine seating?

The word “mezzanine” comes from the Italian word for “middle,” which should technically apply to the section between the orchestra and balcony. However, many Broadway houses have an orchestra and mezzanine but no balcony. Most of them, in fact. So, these “mezzanines” are technically balconies.

What are the best seats at a theatre?

For a standard movie theater with exit rows on the sides (as opposed to down the middle, as some older theaters have), the best spot is as close to dead center as you can get. “I’ve always felt the obvious best spot to sit in a movie theater is in the center of the room, center with the screen.

What are levels in theatre?

Levels can be used to suggest status – meaning the power or authority one character has over another. It’s important to consider what the use of levels suggests when staging a scene. Levels can also be used to suggest various locations.

What is a theatron?

Theatron: The theatron (literally, “viewing-place”) is where the spectators sat. The theatron was usually part of hillside overlooking the orchestra, and often wrapped around a large portion of the orchestra (see the diagram above).



Where are the stalls in a theatre?

Stalls seats are on the ground level of the theatre. Typically, stalls seats can be regarded as some of the best seats in the auditorium, due to their close proximity to the stage. If you’re sitting in the first few rows of the stalls seats, you may even be able to touch the stage and see performers blink.

What is a theatre balcony called?

The general term for the upper levels is “balconies” or “galleries“. The lowest gallery is often called the “circle” or “dress circle” because it was where the rich people would sit, wanting not just to see but to be seen. The highest gallery is often called “the gods” (because it’s up very high).

Which of the places below are part of the auditorium?

Auditorium structure



The seating areas can include some or all of the following: Stalls, orchestra or arena: the lower flat area, usually below or at the same level as the stage. Balconies or galleries: one or more raised seating platforms towards the rear of the auditorium.

What is the second level of a theater called?

One is at the front, used by the audience, and leads into a foyer and ticketing. The second is called the stage door, and it is accessible from backstage. This is where the cast and crew enter and exit the theater, and fans sometimes wait outside it after the show in order to get autographs, called “stage dooring”.

What is the difference between circle and stalls?

The dress circle – Also sometimes called the Royal Circle, first balcony or mezzanine, the dress circle is the next tier of seating above the stalls. Here’s where you usually get the best views in the house, although if you’re tall the leg room can be an issue, especially in older theatres.



Which is the best place to sit in a theatre?

“The ideal place is the middle of whichever row ensures that the edges of the screen are right at the edge of your peripheral vision. But if you’ve had a few beers before a movie or need to leave the theater quickly, an aisle seat is ideal since your bathroom trip won’t disrupt the other filmgoers.”

What is the best seating in a theatre?

While the back may be the safest option comfort-wise, experts say that the middle row has the best seating. According to Groupon, an ideal row in the movie theater is “the center row and the four rows behind it, which is about one-half to two-thirds back.”

Is it better to sit in the stalls or the dress circle?

Sitting in the stalls always lets you see the expressions of the actors more and can be more personal. For a better view of the full stage you should opt for the dress circle.

Why is it called a dress circle?

– So called because it is a circular row of seats at an entertainment, the spectators of which are expected to be in dress clothes. See also related terms for seats.



What are the circle in a theatre?

Dress Circle



Sometimes called the Royal Circle, this is often the middle level in an auditorium, or in theatres where there are only two, it is the top level.

Is mezzanine same as dress circle?

Dress Circle has always been called Dress Circle. Only name change is that the currant mezzanine used to be called the First Balcony and what is currantly called the Balcony was called the second balcony. There is no deception going on as any seat that has any part of the stage blocked is sold as obstructed view.